Unique Spa Treatments

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Spas around the world are luring guests and well-seekers with wild and wacky treatments.

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Check this one out. Eau de…vin? This wine is not suitable for drinking, or is it? Bathers soak in the red wine bath of Hakone Kowakien Yunessun (a Japanese spa with theme baths) in Kowakien, Hakone, Japan. Real red wine is poured into the water. Bathing in red wine rejuvenates the body and supposedly even Cleopatra used to bathe in red wine. Hakone is a mountain famous for its hot springs and Japanese style spa, not to mention its breathtaking views of Mount Fuji.
(Androniki Christodoulou/WpN) Read about other RED WINE THERAPIES

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It looks like a scene out of “Indiana Jones,” but it’s actually the scene of a serene spa day. Liz Cohen receives a treatment by letting snakes loose on her body at a spa in the northern communal village of Talmey El’Azar, Israel. Ada Barak, the owner of the spa, uses California and Florida king snakes, corn snakes and milk snakes in her treatments, which she said were inspired by her belief that once people get over any initial misgivings, they find physical contact with the creatures to be soothing.
(Yonathan Weitzman/Reuters)

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Several hundreds of apples a day keep the doctors away, at least this spa hopes. Diana Hadi, a staff member at Malaysia’s Tiara Beach Resort, poses in a swimming pool with some 20,000 apples in it in an attempt to set the national record for “The Most Number of Apples Used In Spa Therapy” in Port Dickson, 75 miles south of Kuala Lumpur.
(Bazuki Muhammad/Reuters)

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You’ve heard of beer-battered chicken and other meats, but have you heard of a beer bath? Nothing like some pale ale to help rejuvenate the skin. Jarmila Kovarikova, 26, left, enjoys a soak in the Real Beer Bath in the town of Chodova Plana, Czech Republic. The spa, believed to be the world’s first beer health center, has opened a hotel at the Chodovar family brewery. The spa offers a soothing hot bath containing healing mineral water and a dark bathing beer. This original curative therapy claims to have rejuvenating effects. There is also a bathside bar so you can sip beer while soaking in it.
(Michal Novotny/WpN)

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It’s every parents cleaning nightmare — a chocolate-covered kid. But at this spa in Japan, bathing in chocolate is the thing to do. A girl tastes the water in a bath incorporating chocolate at a hot spring spa resort in Hakone, west of Tokyo. The resort says the bath containing cacao extract and trehalose has the effect of keeping moisture in the skin and producing beautiful skin.
(Kiyoshi Ota / Reuters)

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Two models play in fake snow descending from the ceiling in Qua’s Arctic Ice Room at the Caesars Palace hotel-casino in Las Vegas. Some people come to Las Vegas to enjoy the clear skies and warm days, but at a new spa that opened at Caesar’s Palace, there is a treatment room where it snows all year long. Welcome to Qua’s Arctic Ice Room, where “snow” gently descends from a domed ceiling through mint-infused air chilled to 55 degrees Fahrenheit.
(Jae C. Hong/AP Photo)

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That looks more like tar than a soothing bath, but Ramil Mutukhov, from Baleken, Azerbaijan, lays in a bath of Naftalan to help with his back pain. Some people believe that bathing in Naftalan, a nonflammable form of crude oil found in parts of Azerbaijan, cures everything from joint pain to skin disorders to some STDs.
(Joseph Sywenkyj/Redux)

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Move over Dr. Scholls, there’s a new foot therapy in town. Japanese visitors enjoy the “Dr. Fish” bath at Hakone Kowakien in a hot spring resort, west of Tokyo. The resort hotel opened the Dr. Fish bath that contains 1,000 West Asian fish. The Garra rufa fish used in this spa is known as “Doctor Fish” since it feeds on the dead skin from the feet of visitors and is believed by some to cure skin diseases.
(Toshiyuki Aizawa / Reuters)

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Talk about the golden touch. Here a model demonstrates the use of Umo Inc.’s 24-carat gold leaf “gold facial treatment” in Tokyo. The treatment costs roughly $250. For that I think I’d rather a fine piece of gold jewelry than a gold facial.
(Toru Hanai / Reuters)

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